Category Archives: Printables

Right brain training with G – Peg memory 81-100 (Printable)

peg memory

This is the final instalment of the peg memory series. Over the past year, I’ve covered peg memory from 1 to 100 🙂 With regular practice, the peg memory system will be a useful tool to help with activities requiring memorization. For an example of how to use it, you can refer to my previous post here. Do try it!

Download it here ==> Peg memory 81-90

Download it here ==> Peg memory 91-100

Just a note:
Peg memory material for 1-100 can also be accessed here => Home practice material

Have you tried peg memory already?

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Right brain training with G – Peg memory 71-80 (Printable)

peg memory

Sorry about the late updates on peg memory. I’ll be updating the peg memory material for 80-100 in the next few days 🙂

Download it here ==> Peg memory 71-80

Just a note:
Peg memory material for 1-60 can be accessed here => Home practice material

Have you tried peg memory already?

Right brain training with G – Peg memory 61-70 (Printable)

peg memory

It’s been a while since I did the last update on G’s right brain training class. Due to unforeseen circumstances, we took a month’s break from the usual weekly class. Classes will be restarting in October, so do look out for the updates soon!

Download it here ==> Peg memory 61-70

Just a note:
Peg memory material for 1-60 can be accessed here => Home practice material

Have you tried peg memory already?

Right brain training with G – Peg memory 51-60 (Printable)

peg memoryI’ve been attending a management effectiveness course, and surprise, surprise – peg words and peg pictures were taught as a useful tool for remembering key concepts. I’ll be sharing a little more this method soon! In the meantime, here’s the next 10 peg memory picture/words.

Download it here ==> Peg memory 51-60

For peg memory printables for numbers 1-50, please refer to  the Home practice material page.

Have you tried peg memory already?

Right brain training with G – Peg memory 41-50 (Printable)

peg memory

It’s been a while since I’ve uploaded home practice materials. Here’s the 5th installation 🙂

Download it here ==> Peg memory 41-50

For peg memory printables for numbers 1-40, please refer to my previous posts:
Peg memory 1-10
Peg memory 11-20
Peg memory 21-30
Peg memory 31-40

Just a note:
As I’ve received multiple requests to share my home practice material, I’ve also created a page to consolidate the material for easy access and download. It can be accessed here => Home practice material

Have you tried peg memory already?

Project: Lapbook – China

It’s been a while since my last lapbook. In the past term, C was learning about China in school, so I thought it would be interesting to start a lapbook on the same topic. It would also be a good chance to start a discussion with her on her Chinese heritage.

In the lapbook, we had the usual items – things found in China, its location on the world map, the China flag. I also included some interesting information about China – its capital, currency, population and leader. C already knew about Beijing, but wasn’t aware of the country’s other ancient capitals. She was also amazed at the birth rate in China (one baby born every 1.9sec!).

chinalapbook8.jpg

Capital, population, currency and leader

I had little cards with pictures of Chinese inventions – she had learnt about some of them in school, but was surprised when I told her that the toothbrush was a Chinese invention (“How did they brush their teeth before the toothbrush was invented?“). Paper making was a fascinating topic for her too (we will probably try doing this during the holidays).

Chinese inventions

Chinese inventions

I explained that prior to paper, the ancient Chinese used to write on scrolls made up of bamboo strips or silk. As a craft activity, we created a scroll out of popsicle sticks and twine (because popsicle sticks are much easier to find compared to bamboo strips!).

Tip: If you intend to make your own scrolls, line the sticks and mark the spot where you intend to tie the twine (about 1.5-2cm from the top). Then use a penknife to cut notches – it will help the twine stay in position.

Making the scroll

Making the scroll

On the completed scroll, C copied part of the Three Character Classic (三字经), one of the Chinese classic texts. We used a black marker for writing. I wrote some of the more difficult words in pencil so she could trace it. I was really proud that she managed to write so neatly! We did some revision on the recitation of the text too.

Completed scroll

Completed scroll with Three Character Classic

When learning the chinese language, C had complained that some of the characters were difficult to write, unlike the english alphabet (in her words: “there are so many strokes!“). I explained that the language evolved from pictograms (象型字), and that most of the words had interesting origins. We viewed an interesting video on youtube, and I included a matching game in the lapbook. She was much more willing to learn about the chinese characters after that. Note: The original pictogram from which the current form evolved is included at the corner of the picture card.

Match the picture to the word

Match the picture to the word

Besides the Three Character Classic, I also introduced another classic text called Hundred Family Surnames (百家姓). I explained that since China was so big, there were literally hundreds of different surnames (currently there are 504). I printed out a list and asked her to locate her surname, my surname, and her grandmother’s surname. I explained that there were some surnames that were very common, and there were a lot of people who had the same surnames although they did not come from the same family.

Hundred Family Surnames

Hundred Family Surnames

I took the opportunity to explain that some of the surnames originated from the same area in China. She had learnt that there were 56 ethnic groups in China, so I showed her the different regions of China where each ethnic group resided. I explained that her grandfather and ancestors came from China (and showed her on the map). She was amazed that her grandfather and ancestors actually came from China (we had not explained this to her prior to this discussion).

Different regions in China

Different regions in China

Here’s the completed lapbook! While this project has been completed, this was just the beginning of C’s journey to learn more about her Chinese heritage.

China lapbook

China lapbook

Download the lapbook here ==>Lap book-China

How do you teach your children about their heritage?

Project: Dragon boat festival

The dragon boat festival (端午节) is celebrated on the 5th day of the 5th lunar month on the Chinese calendar (五月初五). This year, the festival falls on 12th of June.

This festival commemorates the sacrifice of Qu Yuan (屈原), a poet from the Chu State during the Warring States Period (476 BC – 221 BC). Qu Yuan was a very patriotic and loyal advisor in the court of King Huai. However, the king was misguided by corrupt officials, and sent Qu Yuan into exile. Without the loyal advisor’s counsel, the state was eventually defeated by the neighboring Qin State.

On this day, upon learning of the fall of his state, Qu Yuan is believed to have jumped into the Miluo river in despair. He was well-loved and respected by the people, and they wanted to protect his body from the fishes in the river. In order to do so, the villagers threw sticky rice dumplings into the river as food for the fishes, paddled out in their boats and beat drums in order to drive the fishes away. This practice has been carried on as cultural tradition: we continue to eat rice dumplings (粽子) and have dragon boat races (赛龙舟) on this day.

I wanted the kids to know more about our Chinese traditions and customs, and thought that it would be fun to do some related activities with the kids to celebrate this festival.

We began by reading a book on Qu Yuan that I borrowed from the library. It was a good chance to talk a little about Chinese history. Of course, there were a lot of questions from C on why he chose to jump into the river…

dbf6.jpg

We then created our own dragon boats. I found a template online for the base of our dragon boat, and drew the dragon head and tail to be pasted on (I drew it freehand, sorry I’m not that artistic). The kids were given the template to decorate, before I cut and assembled the boats. I must say that I was pleased with how the boats turned out. C wanted to do more of them – we are going to try “racing” them tomorrow.

G dotting away

G dotting away

dgf1.jpg

Dragon boats by C (background) and G (foreground)

We also made rice dumpling maracas. I found a tutorial to fold a triangular pyramid here, and made it together with C. We used 4 pieces of 12cmx12cm construction paper for each dumpling. C needed some help with some of the folds, but she managed to follow most of the instructions. C and G helped to add some rice grains into the “dumplings” before we sealed them up with tape. The kids loved these! Note: This could get messy! We had rice grains all over the table.

Rice dumpling maracas!

Rice dumpling maracas!

In line with the theme, I also created some homeschooling material to learn chinese numbers. The same material can also be used for colour matching, sequencing, or photographic memory practice.

Chinese numbers

Chinese numbers

What comes next?

What comes next?

For C, I made some worksheets for writing and hanyu pinyin practice.

dbf7.jpg

Writing and pinyin practice

Of course, I’ll be preparing rice dumplings for the kids to enjoy! 🙂

Are you doing anything to celebrate the dragon boat festival? How about making a dragon boat for your own race?

Download your printables here!
Printable – Dragon boat craft
Printable – Dragon boat math
Printable – Dragon boat writing and pinyin

Note: You’ll also be able to find the links for the downloads on my Home Practice Materials page here.

Credits:
denverartmuseum.org for the paper canoe base
visualmandarin.com for the chinese stroke sequence