Category Archives: Printables

Right brain training with G – Peg memory 81-100 (Printable)

peg memory

This is the final instalment of the peg memory series. Over the past year, I’ve covered peg memory from 1 to 100 🙂 With regular practice, the peg memory system will be a useful tool to help with activities requiring memorization. For an example of how to use it, you can refer to my previous post here. Do try it!

Download it here ==> Peg memory 81-90

Download it here ==> Peg memory 91-100

Just a note:
Peg memory material for 1-100 can also be accessed here => Home practice material

Have you tried peg memory already?

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Right brain training with G – Peg memory 71-80 (Printable)

peg memory

Sorry about the late updates on peg memory. I’ll be updating the peg memory material for 80-100 in the next few days 🙂

Download it here ==> Peg memory 71-80

Just a note:
Peg memory material for 1-60 can be accessed here => Home practice material

Have you tried peg memory already?

Right brain training with G – Peg memory 61-70 (Printable)

peg memory

It’s been a while since I did the last update on G’s right brain training class. Due to unforeseen circumstances, we took a month’s break from the usual weekly class. Classes will be restarting in October, so do look out for the updates soon!

Download it here ==> Peg memory 61-70

Just a note:
Peg memory material for 1-60 can be accessed here => Home practice material

Have you tried peg memory already?

Right brain training with G – Peg memory 51-60 (Printable)

peg memoryI’ve been attending a management effectiveness course, and surprise, surprise – peg words and peg pictures were taught as a useful tool for remembering key concepts. I’ll be sharing a little more this method soon! In the meantime, here’s the next 10 peg memory picture/words.

Download it here ==> Peg memory 51-60

For peg memory printables for numbers 1-50, please refer to  the Home practice material page.

Have you tried peg memory already?

Right brain training with G – Peg memory 41-50 (Printable)

peg memory

It’s been a while since I’ve uploaded home practice materials. Here’s the 5th installation 🙂

Download it here ==> Peg memory 41-50

For peg memory printables for numbers 1-40, please refer to my previous posts:
Peg memory 1-10
Peg memory 11-20
Peg memory 21-30
Peg memory 31-40

Just a note:
As I’ve received multiple requests to share my home practice material, I’ve also created a page to consolidate the material for easy access and download. It can be accessed here => Home practice material

Have you tried peg memory already?

Project: Lapbook – China

It’s been a while since my last lapbook. In the past term, C was learning about China in school, so I thought it would be interesting to start a lapbook on the same topic. It would also be a good chance to start a discussion with her on her Chinese heritage.

In the lapbook, we had the usual items – things found in China, its location on the world map, the China flag. I also included some interesting information about China – its capital, currency, population and leader. C already knew about Beijing, but wasn’t aware of the country’s other ancient capitals. She was also amazed at the birth rate in China (one baby born every 1.9sec!).

chinalapbook8.jpg

Capital, population, currency and leader

I had little cards with pictures of Chinese inventions – she had learnt about some of them in school, but was surprised when I told her that the toothbrush was a Chinese invention (“How did they brush their teeth before the toothbrush was invented?“). Paper making was a fascinating topic for her too (we will probably try doing this during the holidays).

Chinese inventions

Chinese inventions

I explained that prior to paper, the ancient Chinese used to write on scrolls made up of bamboo strips or silk. As a craft activity, we created a scroll out of popsicle sticks and twine (because popsicle sticks are much easier to find compared to bamboo strips!).

Tip: If you intend to make your own scrolls, line the sticks and mark the spot where you intend to tie the twine (about 1.5-2cm from the top). Then use a penknife to cut notches – it will help the twine stay in position.

Making the scroll

Making the scroll

On the completed scroll, C copied part of the Three Character Classic (äž‰ć­—ç»), one of the Chinese classic texts. We used a black marker for writing. I wrote some of the more difficult words in pencil so she could trace it. I was really proud that she managed to write so neatly! We did some revision on the recitation of the text too.

Completed scroll

Completed scroll with Three Character Classic

When learning the chinese language, C had complained that some of the characters were difficult to write, unlike the english alphabet (in her words: “there are so many strokes!“). I explained that the language evolved from pictograms (è±Ąćž‹ć­—), and that most of the words had interesting origins. We viewed an interesting video on youtube, and I included a matching game in the lapbook. She was much more willing to learn about the chinese characters after that. Note: The original pictogram from which the current form evolved is included at the corner of the picture card.

Match the picture to the word

Match the picture to the word

Besides the Three Character Classic, I also introduced another classic text called Hundred Family Surnames (ç™Ÿćź¶ć§“). I explained that since China was so big, there were literally hundreds of different surnames (currently there are 504). I printed out a list and asked her to locate her surname, my surname, and her grandmother’s surname. I explained that there were some surnames that were very common, and there were a lot of people who had the same surnames although they did not come from the same family.

Hundred Family Surnames

Hundred Family Surnames

I took the opportunity to explain that some of the surnames originated from the same area in China. She had learnt that there were 56 ethnic groups in China, so I showed her the different regions of China where each ethnic group resided. I explained that her grandfather and ancestors came from China (and showed her on the map). She was amazed that her grandfather and ancestors actually came from China (we had not explained this to her prior to this discussion).

Different regions in China

Different regions in China

Here’s the completed lapbook! While this project has been completed, this was just the beginning of C’s journey to learn more about her Chinese heritage.

China lapbook

China lapbook

Download the lapbook here ==>Lap book-China

How do you teach your children about their heritage?

Project: Dragon boat festival

The dragon boat festival (ç«ŻćˆèŠ‚) is celebrated on the 5th day of the 5th lunar month on the Chinese calendar (äș”æœˆćˆäș”). This year, the festival falls on 12th of June.

This festival commemorates the sacrifice of Qu Yuan (ć±ˆćŽŸ), a poet from the Chu State during the Warring States Period (476 BC – 221 BC). Qu Yuan was a very patriotic and loyal advisor in the court of King Huai. However, the king was misguided by corrupt officials, and sent Qu Yuan into exile. Without the loyal advisor’s counsel, the state was eventually defeated by the neighboring Qin State.

On this day, upon learning of the fall of his state, Qu Yuan is believed to have jumped into the Miluo river in despair. He was well-loved and respected by the people, and they wanted to protect his body from the fishes in the river. In order to do so, the villagers threw sticky rice dumplings into the river as food for the fishes, paddled out in their boats and beat drums in order to drive the fishes away. This practice has been carried on as cultural tradition: we continue to eat rice dumplings (çČœć­) and have dragon boat races (蔛韙舟) on this day.

I wanted the kids to know more about our Chinese traditions and customs, and thought that it would be fun to do some related activities with the kids to celebrate this festival.

We began by reading a book on Qu Yuan that I borrowed from the library. It was a good chance to talk a little about Chinese history. Of course, there were a lot of questions from C on why he chose to jump into the river…

dbf6.jpg

We then created our own dragon boats. I found a template online for the base of our dragon boat, and drew the dragon head and tail to be pasted on (I drew it freehand, sorry I’m not that artistic). The kids were given the template to decorate, before I cut and assembled the boats. I must say that I was pleased with how the boats turned out. C wanted to do more of them – we are going to try “racing” them tomorrow.

G dotting away

G dotting away

dgf1.jpg

Dragon boats by C (background) and G (foreground)

We also made rice dumpling maracas. I found a tutorial to fold a triangular pyramid here, and made it together with C. We used 4 pieces of 12cmx12cm construction paper for each dumpling. C needed some help with some of the folds, but she managed to follow most of the instructions. C and G helped to add some rice grains into the “dumplings” before we sealed them up with tape. The kids loved these! Note: This could get messy! We had rice grains all over the table.

Rice dumpling maracas!

Rice dumpling maracas!

In line with the theme, I also created some homeschooling material to learn chinese numbers. The same material can also be used for colour matching, sequencing, or photographic memory practice.

Chinese numbers

Chinese numbers

What comes next?

What comes next?

For C, I made some worksheets for writing and hanyu pinyin practice.

dbf7.jpg

Writing and pinyin practice

Of course, I’ll be preparing rice dumplings for the kids to enjoy! 🙂

Are you doing anything to celebrate the dragon boat festival? How about making a dragon boat for your own race?

Download your printables here!
Printable – Dragon boat craft
Printable – Dragon boat math
Printable – Dragon boat writing and pinyin

Note: You’ll also be able to find the links for the downloads on my Home Practice Materials page here.

Credits:
denverartmuseum.org for the paper canoe base
visualmandarin.com for the chinese stroke sequence

Right brain training with G – Peg memory 31-40 (Printable)

peg memory

Here’s the 4th installation of peg memory materials.

Download it here ==> Peg memory 31-40

For peg memory printables for numbers 1-30, please refer to my previous posts:
Peg memory 1-10
Peg memory 11-20
Peg memory 21-30

Just a note:
As I’ve received multiple requests to share my home practice material, I’ve also created a page to consolidate the material for easy access and download. It can be accessed here => Home practice material

Have you tried peg memory already?

ESP – Fact or Fiction?

ESP

ESP (extrasensory perception)
noun \ˌē-ˌes-ˈpē\ apparent power to perceive things that are not present to the senses

When we think about ESP, what are the terms that come to mind? Paranormal ability? Science fiction? Mystery? Sixth sense?

ESP, or extrasensory perception, is believed to be one of the right brain’s many abilities, hence ESP exercises are part of right brain training classes at Shichida and Heguru. Frankly speaking, I have always been skeptical of this aspect of right brain training. C’s class back then did not have any ESP exercises, so I had always listened to the testimonials of Shichida mummies with a tinge of disbelief. Photographic memory (another ability of the right brain), I can accept. Sensing colours through touch? Looking through cards? My scientifically-trained mind struggled with such concepts. Not logical, not possible.

Then G started Heguru. And proved me wrong. The rate at which he got the answers correct was too much of a coincidence.

In a bid to understand a little bit more on this “mysterious ability” and its connection to the right brain, I have bought and recently completed reading “Right Brain Education in Infancy” by Dr Makoto Shichida.

About Dr Makoto Shichida
For those who are not familiar with the name, he is the founder of the Shichida Method, one of the most famous and popular schools for right brain education in Japan and worldwide. His research in brain development and education has changed the way we approach learning in young children.

Dr Shichida’s theory
In his book, Dr Shichida explains some of his theories on the faculties of the right brain, which has not been fully understood. This includes the mysterious ability known as ESP.

Dr Shichida theorizes that the five senses of sight, smell, touch, hearing and taste are controlled consciously by the left brain, but subconsciously by the right brain. Thus, in fact, the “sixth sense” should not be referred to as ESP, but rather the same five senses governed by the right brain on a different scale. Using the right brain, we are able to “see”, “hear”, “smell”, “feel” or “taste” hidden objects.

In quantum physics, scientists have succeeded in analysing objects at a subatomic level.  In their studies, they have discovered that the most fundamental particles vibrate. In other words, all objects on earth emit energy waves (think x-ray, MRI or CT scans, which make use of this theory to perform medical analysis). To explain the ESP ability in humans, Dr Shichida states that the human cells are in fact receptacles of such resonance, and by tuning our senses to interpret these frequencies, we are able to perceive what was previously unknown.

quantum-image

5 categories of ESP
ESP can be broken down into 5 categories: telepathy, clairvoyance, tactility, precognition and telekinesis.

  • Telepathy is the transmission of information from one person to another without using any of our known sensory channels or physical interaction.
  • Clairvoyance refers to the ability to gain information about an object, person, location or physical event through means other than the known human senses.
  • Tactility refers to the ability to guess the letter or symbol on the card by touch.
  • Precognition is also known as the ability to foretell the future.
  • Telekinesis is the ability to cause something physical to happen by willing it.

Heguru class includes exercises for all of the above except telekinesis. Some examples of activities:

  • Telepathy: The teacher tells the students that she will be sending them an image of a shape. Given a few different cards, the students are supposed to pick the correct one based on the image they receive in their mind.
  • Clairvoyance: A card is placed face-down on the board. By concentrating on the card, the students attempt to “see” through the card.
  • Tactility: The students are given two objects in an opaque bag, e.g. a blue spoon and an orange spoon. They are told that when they touch the blue spoon, they will taste water, and orange will give the taste of orange juice. The students need to guess the correct colour of the object by touch, and “tasting” the object.
  • Precognition: The teacher gives a few cards with different coloured squares. The student is to guess the colour facing up on a cube thrown by the teacher (there are different colours on each side of the cube).

Why ESP?
I had wondered why G had to do ESP exercises – I was not looking to train him to become a mindreader when I sent him for right brain classes. In his book, Dr Shichida explains that children below the age of 3 are naturally predisposed to use their right brain, and ESP exercises also help to train their visualisation ability.

By being able to visualise clearly the images formed in their brain, the children can memorise large amounts of information rapidly (photographic memory) and also form creative images in their minds (when asked to write a story, the children are able to visualise clearly the characters and hence simply need to describe what they “see” in their brain).

Children move from right brain predominance to left brain predominance by age 6, so by training the right brain when young, it helps to maintain this balance of right vs left brain predominance even when they grow older.

My Thoughts
After reading the book, I had a better understanding of Dr Shichida’s theories, and why some of the activities were carried out in class. The parts regarding wave theory actually made some sense to me (it also explains why some people insist that talking to their plants made them grow better – same theory!). Although I may never experience the same ESP as perhaps G is experiencing, I think that this ability might really exist (especially in very young children).

If you are interested in trying some simple ESP exercises with your child, here’s a simple document I’ve prepared that you can try at home ==> ESP exercises

Do you believe in ESP? Have you experienced any ESP-related events?

Right brain training with G – Peg memory 21-30 (Printable)

peg memory

Here’s the 3rd installation of peg memory materials. For peg memory printables for numbers 1-20, please refer to my previous posts :
Peg memory 1-10
Peg memory 11-20

Progress update
Unfortunately I have not been very diligent practising the peg memory with G. Recently, we have been concentrating a bit more on fine-motor skills (cutting) and doing the 2nd round of the dots cards. Work has been rather hectic the past two weeks, so hopefully next week will be better and I will have more time to concentrate on the peg memory exercises with G. 🙂

Download it here ==> Peg memory 21-30

Have you tried peg memory already?