Peg Memory – What’s that?

peg memoryHaving posted quite a few sets of material on peg memory, some of you might still be wondering: “What’s peg memory? How do I use it in actual situations? Is it even useful?”

Well, as I’ve mentioned in my previous post, I’m currently attending a course on effective communication, and guess what? We were taught to use peg memory to remember some of the important concepts!

So how do we apply peg memory?

Revising peg words/pictures
First, let’s start with our peg words 1-9:
1-first
2-tooth
3-tree
4-fork
5-fire
6-seeds
7-heaven
8-plate
9-night

** It is important to memorise the peg numbers and corresponding peg words before you can use them effectively! It is not necessary to use the above peg words, but once you form a set, they should be used all the time.

Then, let’s take a look at the important concepts that we want to remember (from Dale Carnegie’s rules for success):

1. Don’t criticize, condemn or complain.
2. Give honest, sincere appreciation.
3. Arouse in the other person an eager want.
4. Become genuinely interested in other people.
5. Smile.
6. Remember that a person’s name is to that person the sweetest and most
important sound in any language.
7. Be a good listener. Encourage others to talk about themselves.
8. Talk in terms of the other person’s interests.
9. Make the other person feel important – and do it sincerely.

Using peg memory to recall concepts
There are a total of nine points that we want to recall. In order to do so, we make use of the peg numbers and peg words, with the corresponding peg images. To reinforce the recall, actions are also associated with each set. In the examples given below, the peg words and concepts are in bold.

 

Sample story:
1. Don’t criticize, condemn or complain.
Imagine that you are running a race, and come in first (peg word), you are holding up a trophy (action – you have to pretend to hold the trophy), and that trophy looks different – it is in the shape of 3 C’s.

2. Give honest, sincere appreciation.
You have a pain in your tooth (peg word), and you pull it out. To your surprise, it turns into a rose (appreciation), which you throw to your friend (action).

3. Arouse in the other person an eager want.
In front of you is a giant Christmas tree. It is the largest tree that you’ve ever seen!  It starts swaying in the wind. On the very top, instead of a star, you see a wanted poster, with your name on it.

4. Become genuinely interested in other people.
You are having your meal, and you use your fork to pick up a piece of meat. When you put that piece of meat in your mouth and start chewing, you are surprised to find a piece of paper inside. It says “100% interest

5. Smile.
It is a cold winter’s night, and you are sitting in front of a fire, warming your hands. All of a sudden, a giant polar bear appears, and gives you a mega-watt smile.

6. Remember that a person’s name is to that person the sweetest and most important sound in any language.
You are strolling in the garden. All of a sudden, you see Jack, who hands you some magic seeds. You plant and water them, and soon they start to grow. To your surprise, they start to form your name.

7. Be a good listener. Encourage others to talk about themselves.
You are climbing the stairs to heaven. Angels are singing, everything is shiny and white. All of a sudden, you feel something being thrown to you. You look up, and see headphones coming in your direction, and you duck to avoid being hit.

8. Talk in terms of the other person’s interests.
You are in your house, washing plates. The sink is blocked, water starts overflowing. You reach down into the drain to find out what is stuck, and you withdraw your hand to find a microphone.

9. Make the other person feel important – and do it sincerely.
It is a beautiful night, and you are in a party dancing with the man/woman of your dreams. The crowds part, and in comes a waiter carrying a barrel of wine. On the barrel, the label says, “important“.

The stranger the story, the better the recall
By making the story as lively and detailed as possible, it’s possible to remember the concepts with ease. Everyone’s story may be a little different, but it doesn’t matter. The stranger or more ridiculous the story, the deeper the impression. Everyone in our class managed to remember the nine points without difficulty, using this method!

In Heguru, instead of remembering concepts, we will be using peg pictures to recall large strings of numbers (by converting the numbers into the corresponding peg pictures) – more on that in a later post 🙂

If your children have difficulty remembering theories or concepts, why don’t you try using this method of recall? Your children will be able to remember interesting stories better than dry facts 😉

What is your opinion on peg memory?

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11 thoughts on “Peg Memory – What’s that?

  1. Adeline

    Wah! I think I will have trouble remembering everything! Maybe I should start practising on my own soon. Thanks for the very detailed instructions on how to make use of peg-memory!

    Reply
    1. mummyshymz Post author

      Hehe it looks more complicated than it actually is. Just make up your own story – it will be easier this way. Also use actions when you tell the story, it really helps to internalize the concepts 🙂 do give it a try and let me know if you find this method useful.

      Reply
  2. rfern002

    Hi Mummyshymz
    Thank you very much for the posts on right brain activaties and flash cards
    I came across your site while search on the topic : How to flash cards in the Shichida 50 cards set – with the silly story.
    I was not sure of the procedure and the result to expect
    Raymond

    Reply
  3. Pingback: Right brain training with G – Peg memory 81-100 (Printable) | mummyshymz

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