Have your kids met the quota?

Fact:
Toddlers and preschoolers = Rapid-fire, non-stop questions

A few years back when C was a toddler, we were worried when she did not start talking by the time she turned one. She was a relatively quiet baby, in comparison to other children. Turned out that our worries were unfounded because when she did start, she more than made up for lost time. We have been continuously challenged with questions ever since:

“How does a bird fly?”
“When am I going to grow up?”
“Am I going to have a baby next time?”
“What happens when I mix brown and brown? Does it become browner?”…
“Ewww… what is this on my plate?”
“Why do I have to eat carrots?”

And not forgetting the classic one-word question: “Why?”

The endless questions used to drive me crazy. Have you ever wondered how many questions children ask in a day? I tried to count- but lost track after question no. 101.

Well, a recent survey seems to have answered my query. They have found that children between the ages 0 to 9 asked an average of 288 questions a day. 4-year old girls ask the most questions – 390 (averaging a question every one minute 56 seconds of their waking day! Ah, that figures!)

And apparently, 82% of infants go to their mother first. Why? A quarter of children, 24%, said they do this because their father will  just say ‘ask your mum’ (so true!).

G has not been talking a lot, yet. While some new parents might be worried, I’m not. I’m just enjoying the relative peace for now. 🙂

So, do you agree with the survey?

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31 thoughts on “Have your kids met the quota?

  1. tric

    My friends young son went through a phase of non stop questions. Then one day he must have even annoyed himself because he said, “mum, why do I say why all the time?”.

    Reply
  2. Zee

    Wow! 288 questions!! That’s insane! Haha. (I obviously haven’t reached that stage.) The bit in the survey about why kids go to the mom first is probably true!

    Anyway I’m now at a “call mama 1000 times a day and expect her to respond immediately” stage. Ok i exaggerate.maybe 100 times? It’s so funny because at one point in time (as with all first time moms), I couldn’t wait for the day Aly will call me mama. She called me mama pretty late and I guess she’s also making up for lost time! :p

    Reply
    1. mummyshymz Post author

      Haha… When Aly starts asking “Why?” I don’t think you’ll be doubting the numbers. Lol. Sometimes at the office, I get calls from C with her questions.

      I understand… 1000 may not be an exaggeration, especially when it becomes a chant while you are in the bathroom. “mummy, mummy, mummy,mummy….maaaaaaa-MY!!!!!”

      Reply
  3. Virtual_Momma

    I love this post! It is so true and it drives us crazy as moms. The thing it reminds us of, though, is that young children are eager to learn everything they can and i love that part 🙂

    Reply
    1. mummyshymz Post author

      Haha, yes! The questions get more challenging as they grow older though. “Why do people fight?” I need to think really hard to come up with good answers.

      Reply
      1. mummyshymz Post author

        I’m starting to see the change in the line of questioning as C grows up. Looking forward to the day when I can have a real discussion 🙂

  4. Valerie

    OH my, yes! Both Maggie and Joshua both talked their heads off (and mine) when they were younger! J still does, as a matter of fact…and it almost always starts with “Mama….” 😉

    Reply
  5. AngieD

    I’m not there yet, but I can BARELY handle the “mom, mommy, mom, mom, mama, mommy” phase. I must shout WHAT?! at least five times a day. Dear Lord, I need more patience for the why stage. 🙂

    Reply
    1. mummyshymz Post author

      Have faith that we will get through this phase. I’m sure that I will miss the “a question a minute” phase in future, though some days it can be really trying. At least with this survey, you know that you are definitely not alone, and “hundreds” of questions are not an exaggeration! 😉

      Reply
  6. BeWithUs

    I remembered a student asking me this question:

    Student: Why do I need to learn? A monster doesn’t need to learn.
    My reply: A monster needs to learn in order to become a scary monster.
    Student: …..

    Cheers~ 😀

    Reply
      1. BeWithUs

        LOL..I was surprised by my answer as well (a dog being driven up the wall, I guess)…for he was really a ‘question child’….Cheers~ 😀

  7. motherhoodisanart

    haha!!! Great post! Oh yes, I most certainly agree with the survey! Also, all 3 of mine were talking before the age of 1 but the third abruptly quit talking after his first birthday. After a few months I became very concerned and brought him in for a hearing test and other exams. They couldn’t find anything wrong. Finally at 18 months he started talking again and boy oh boy he was obviously just saving everything up because not only did he have a big vocabulary but he still has never stopped talking from that moment!!

    Reply
  8. runningafterale

    What a fantastic post! My son is just about to turn 18 months and does not really talk yet. We are a bilingual home- I speak English and my husband speaks Spanish to him. Then to make him more confused, his caretakers at his daycare speak Russian! In the end O/m not worried that he is not saying much. However, he clearly has gotten a grasp of NO! In then end I am curious as to what language he will ask all of the questions that will come. In the meantime I should browse through Wikipedia so I can have some answers to his questions!
    On a side note I found it interesting that girls ask more questions.

    Reply
    1. mummyshymz Post author

      Hi, thanks for stopping by! Kids are amazing, and I’m sure that he will surprise you one day by speaking all 3 languages. I’ve a friend’s son who speaks four different languages – to his mum (english), his dad (French), grandma (Tamil) and his helper (Malay). No confusion- he switches languages when he speaks to the different people.
      I’m not surprised – I still talk a lot more than my husband now. Lol!

      Reply

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